WI POU Letters and Records

Record 74/3291 Former Papers Date of Receipt June 24
Date of letter June 20 No 473 Writer Theo Heale
Residence Auckland
Subject Asks for instructions for survey of lands under N.S. Act 73. Encloses application from natives. Wi Pou Ngaitu.

To whom referred 496 15.8.74 when returned
1........
How disposed of Filed 21.8.74 74/4622
Maori Affairs Register MA 12 1874
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Tiopira writes to Chief Judge Fenton re - Wi Pou, counter-claimant to Maunganui : Translation.

Written on top of the following letter - & another
Asking that the money for certain lands may be kept back till they are investigated.

27th July 1874, A letter from Tiopira Taoho & Peneti Pana to Chief Judge Mr Fenton stating - Friend Mr Fenton. Salutations to you. This is a word of ours to you that you must know that there is difficulty among us about our land on the (West Coast) namely Wairau, Oheinowaiotaane, Waipoua, Te Muriwai, Waikara, and a part of Maunganui caused by the boundary of Ngaitu or rather of Wi Pou. This is they. Do you retain the money till after it is adjudicated upon, that you may know whether he has a right to the land. When Col. Mc Donald comes here we will let Government have this side. When they are surveyed we shall be willing to have them adjudicated upon. Be sure to retain the money for Wi Pou's land. Signed Tiopira, Taoho & Peneti Pana.

Record 74/4622 Former Papers 74/3291 Date of Receipt Sept 3
Date of letter Aug 28 No 606 Writer Theo Heale
Residence Auckland
Subject On subject of surveys under the Native L Act 1873.

To whom referred when returned
How disposed of 74/4777
Maori Affairs Register MA 12 1874
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Record 74/4777 Former Papers 74/4622 Date of Receipt Sept 10
Date of letter Sept 8 No tel Writer Sir D McLean
Residence Wellington
Subject rel to Capt Heale re appointment of surveyors under the Native L.S Act 1873.

To whom referred Law Office when returned 15.1.75
How disposed of Filed 10.9.75 74/6624
Maori Affairs Register MA 12 1874
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Judge's Reply - 14 Sept 1874
Judge Fenton's reply : written sideways over the letter - Say I have nothing to do with the survey all our work is to find out the right owners. Sent to Tiopira Taoho, September 14/74. (National Archives BABG A52/81/box 32)
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Record 74/5815 Former Papers Date of Receipt Oct 27
Date of letter Oct 6 No Writer Parore Te Awha
Residence Kaipara
Subject Tiopira Kinaki has sold his land called Maunganui to the Govt in a clandestine manner.

To whom referred when returned
How disposed of Filed 12.11.74
Maori Affairs Register MA 12 1874
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Record 74/5816 Former Papers Date of Receipt Oct 27
Date of letter Oct 6 No Writer Parore Te Awha
Residence Kaipara
Subject Has agreed to dispose of his land called Tutamoi to the Govt extending as far as Mangakahia supposed to contain 800,000 acres.

To whom referred Mr Brissenden 29.10.74 when returned
How disposed of
Maori Affairs Register MA 12 1874
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Tiopira answers Judge Fenton's letter of 14th September 1874 :
22nd October 1874, Tiopira Taoho wrote to Judge Fenton stating - Friend Mr Fenton. Salutions to you. Your letter of the 14th of September has arrived about the piece belonging to Wi Pou. Friend, let Wi Pou's part be surveyed, and also my part on the West side. Let there be one investigation and one Court then let the money be paid. This is all. From your affectionate friend. Tiopira Taoho.

Judge Fenton replies written on letter of 22 October 1874
4th November 1874, Written sideways on to the letter in English copy of letter 22nd October 1874 is Judge Fenton's reply to Tiopira Taoho stating - N.L.C. (File 74/1893) (74-13 40 Enclo) November 4. Tiopira Taoho asking that a certain land may be heard before the money is paid for it.
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Record 74/6173 Former Papers Date of Receipt Nov 16
Date of letter Nov 5 No 933 Writer F.D. Fenton
Residence Auckland
Subject Forwards copy of a letter from Tiopira Taoho rel to a piece of land owned by himself & Wi Pou being surveyed.

To whom referred File when returned
How disposed of 23.11.74
Maori Affairs Register MA 12 1874
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On Letter written to Judge Fenton 18th November 1874
Notation on Maori copy of letter of 22nd October 1874

On a Maori hand written copy of the same letter dated 22nd October 1874 being the translation of the above letter of the 22nd October 1874 there is a written notation written in English across the letter stating - Send copy to the Gov't say I have done it but have no power to prevent Ngaitu paying their survey. Tiopira, Taoho.
November 7/74. The Native Minister 11th/74.
Not Presented to Waitangi Tribunal

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Record 74/6624 Former Papers 74/4777 Date of Receipt Dec 15
Date of letter Dec 5 No tel Writer Theo Heale
Residence Auckland
Subject Wishes agreement prepared and printed in accordance with N.L. Act as already recommended by him.

To whom referred Mr Young 21.12.74 when returned Theo Heale 19.1.75
How disposed of 75/482
Maori Affairs Register MA 12 1874
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Survey of Waipoua & Maunganui :
7th December 1874, Hapakuku Moetara (Te Roroa side by his mother and Ngapuhi of Otaua via his fathers side) writes to McLean (Native Minster) stating - Translation - Friend. Greeting, this is a word in explanation of what Parore said to the surveyors of my land at Maunganui, to the effect "that the survey should not be carried through, if the surveyors were to persist that they would be sent back by guns."
I think that Parore is wrong in stopping the survey. What we say is this, let the survey be proceeded with and the objections raised when it is brought before Court, that would be the right course because all of us namely the tribes of Te Roroa Ngatiwhatua and te Uri-o-hau have consented to hand this land over to Te Taare? (Mr Nelson) that is to the ------- Parore alone is obdurate - if he intends to carry out his threat of sending the Surveyors back by guns these tribes will rise to carry the Maunganui (survey) line through. Do you communicate with Parore lest trouble arise in the district. Sufficient. From your friend Hapakuku Moetara.
(Wai Doc Bank:000393-5)

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Record 75/ 482 Former Papers 74/6624 Date of Receipt Feb 3
Date of letter January 30 No 125 Writer Theo Heale
Residence Auckland
Subject Re the provision of the Native land Act for payment of Surveys

To whom referred Ass't Land Officer 11.2.75 when returned 2.3.75
How disposed of 75/1549

Maori Affairs Department Register MA 5 13 1875
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Parore's Complaint to the Minister and Names his Lands making it Clear he Wants No One to have a claim in the Maunganui Block:
21st February 1875, Parore writes to Sir Donald McLean stating - I have a word to you about Maunganui and Waipoua and up to the top is mine and it has been surveyed and I then went direct to Maunganui and I then wrote direct to the surveyor and stated that the survey should stop at Waikara. (Note - Just north of Maunganui Bluff as the sun was descending from the North) Hone Mohi Ta Nui took my letter to the Surveyor Mr Wilson. (Note - Tiopira's Surveyor) The Pakehas would not listen to stop at Waikara I then returned to the Wairoa and Mr Preece said to me the word to me was that I was to desist from going to Maunganui. I then said I will not desist from going for if I do but if it (the survey) stops at Waikara I will not go back. (Note - Parore didn't want any one to survey land south of Maunganui Bluff) Then Mr Preece said to me if Waikara is left behind it will be wrong. It was then I said my slow word (I actually said) let the matter be settled in the manner of our ancestors and fathers (Note - Referring back to the Wars earlier in the century from 1805 to 1825) then Mr Graham said let it be left for the law to look into. (Note - W.A. Graham, Parore's Surveyor). Enough I will return there only once more and that will be the end.
That is why I (Parore) write to you my land has all been surveyed my word was that the land be divided at Waikara. (Note - North of Maunganui). Enough the matter rests with the administration of the law when an application is made (to the Court) for Maunganui Waikara Te Paku Paketotara Waima Mangatu Waitomi Te Waokupu to the line of Pira thence to the line of the timber (land) sold to Mr Monk - thence to the peg of Mr Monk's line at Ritoatehe the line of Mr Monk's timber Paketi Te Kawa kapake to the peg of the land leased for flax thence to te takahanga. (Note - How Parore gives the boundaries of what was to become the Maunganui block).
Thee are the names of my pieces which are all taken by the Roroa one is Te Uruti (Note - South of the Bluff below the Waihoupai Stream) TeKapoai is another Te Waipohuta kawa is another Waihopai (Note - River to the South of Maunganui Bluff where the entrance met the sea on the edge of Manuwhetai) Te Patapata (Western wall of Maunganui Bluff) Enough this is the end of the names of my pieces.
(Note - referring to the coastal boundary of what became the Maunganui Block where Manuwhetai and Whangaiariki lay) If the law is strong enough to divide them (from the rest) it is well. Friend Sir Donald McLean my heart is crying towards the law namely towards you (I am imploring you) If my land (Note - Maunganui) is divided by the law it will be right. If it is not divided I shall be forced into the ways of the ancestor and fathers. If my letter reaches you reply to it. Enough I have finished, from your true friend Parore te Awha. (Wai Doc Bank: 000389A-000391)

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Purchase Officer informs McLean
24 February, 1875, J W Preece wrote to McLean (Minister) stating - I have the honor to forward herewith a letter written to me by Parore te Awha respecting his claim to land at Maunganui. I may state that when he spoke to me on the subject I told him he had better not interfere with the survey but that any claim he had would receive due consideration at the Court. I have now written him stating that I have forwarded his letter to you. I hear that he has now withdrawn his opposition to the survey and sale. I have the honor to be Sir, your obedient Servant. J.W. Preece. (Wai Doc Bank: 000397)
J.W. Preece enclosed a letter Parore had written him, saying, My idea of settlement is that the line should end at Waikara. He recommended that instructions be sent to Wilson not to carry on the survey to the south of Waikara at the Maunganui end; further, that the agent be instructed to suspend negotiations for the purchase of that portion of the block until the matter was satisfactorily arranged among the disputants. (Wai Doc Bank: 000385)

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Parore's letter to McLean
In an undated letter to McLean, Parore explained his actions and interests at more length: - my land has all been surveyed my word was that the land be divided at Waikara .....If my land is divided by the law it will be right - If it is not divided I shall be forced into the ways of the ancestors and fathers. The line should end at Waikara.
Note - This then became the arbitrary line between Maunganui and Waipoua Blocks. Note how Parore doesn't want any one on his land south of Maunganui Bluff.

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S.P. Smith requested Wilson to Discontinue Survey
4th March, S.P. Smith requested Wilson to discontinue the survey of (Maunganui).
Frank Smith had earlier got his tent on Maunganui Bluff burnt back on 30th January when doing the Trigonometrical survey. This meant that the triangulation survey wasn't extended south of the Bluff itself until some years later in 1881.
Note - But ground survey already completed re Wilson. Where by no proper survey re-subdivision could be done until this had taken place.

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Telegraph to suspend Wilson's survey beyond Waikara :
A telegraph was sent to Mr Brissenden stating - Instruct Surveyor Wilson not to proceed in survey of Maunganui Legend Waikara Chief Parore objects to suspend negotiations for present for that portion. (New Zealand Telegraph No.171; Wai Doc Bank: 000383)

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Inspector of Surveys concerning incomplete Survey :
4th March 1875, A letter from the Inspector of Surveys, Theoph Heale stating - I have the honor to inform you that during the survey of the large Waipoua Block lying between Hokianga and the Kaihu Block a serious dispute arose as to boundaries, between Tiopira & Party (Ngaitu or Wi Pou) on the out side and Parore (Ngapuhi) of Kaihu and on the other. The disputed position lies at Maunganui Bluff, finding that this dispute was likely to lead to a breach of the peace between the two parties. I requested the Messrs Wilson to dis-continue the survey which has been done. (Note - as far south as the North side of the Maunganui Block)
The question now rises as to whether the Block cannot be adjudicated upon in the present state of the survey.
The whole of the boundaries are surveyed with the exception of that portion of the coast lying between the north boundary of Kaihu Block and a little stream immediately to the north of the Bluff. The extremities of Messrs Wilson survey are (or will be) corrected with the Triangulation and it is quite possible to sketch in the intermediate coast line from the Trig Stns as with the exception of the Bluff itself the coast is a perfectly straight line.
In any case it would be impossible to traverse along the bottom of the Bluff as the tide never recedes and it is too precipitous to pass along the face of it. The only place would have been to traverse along the top of the cliff and estimate the off sets? This I believe would not have been more correct than a sketch made from the Trig Stns.
As it is important to get the question of the title to Maunganui settled, seeing that it has been in dispute between these two hapus for many years past and is a matter that is always later to crop up again. I submit that such a sketch survey, should be accepted and if not declared? sufficiently accurate for further purposes, that the remaining piece of coast line should be surveyed when the title has been definitely settled. Then the purpose of enabling? Messrs Wilson to complete their map. It becomes more then ever necessary that as preliminary calculation of the Triangles should be made at once.
I have received your letter of the 17th incl in reference to certain discrepancies existing in Mr Barnards observations at Stns Px and A1 which no doubt arise from the infinity of the instrument used. I have given permission to Mr Barnard to go to town to plot some 3 Blocks that he has surveyed whilst his party are engaged putting up Stns and I hope that he will be able to make the matter clear so that there may be no delay forwarding the lengths to me.-X I should add that this arrangement about the survey of Waipoua seems to have given satisfaction to the Natives concerned in the matter. I have &c
Signed. T.H.(Theoph Heale)
X - Smith? who required that I may be supplied with a copy of Mr Fairburns work to enable me to join on to it, and particularly I want to know whether he has connected the Opaneke & Kaihu surveys with the Triangulation. (Wai Doc Bank: 00 894 & 5)
Note - This information re Triangulation was needed to later make an accurate compiled plan of Maunganui to supercede the Wilson's in-accurate plan of ML3242 which was still to not be closed.

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Minister McLean approved Preeces recommendation
11th March 1875 - (Minister) McLean approved Preece's recommendation. Crown Chief Surveyor, Percy Smith had requested the Wilson's (Tiopira's Surveyor) on 4th March to discontinue the survey and informed Heale: (Inspector of Surveys) - a serious dispute arose as to boundaries, between Tiopira & party (Ngaitu) on the one side and Parore of Kaihu on the other. The disputed portion lies at Maunganui Bluff...The whole of the boundaries are surveyed with the exception of that portion of the coast lying between the north boundary of Kaihu Block and a little stream immediately to the north of the Bluff...it is quite possible to sketch in the intermediate coast line from the Trig stns as with the exception of the Bluff itself the coast is a perfectly straight line ...
- As it is important to get the question of the title to Maunganui settled, seeing that it has been in dispute between these two hapus for many years past and is a matter that is always liable to crop up again, I submit that such a sketch survey, should be accepted and if not deemed sufficiently accurate for further purposes, that the remaining piece of coast line should be surveyed when the title has been definitely settled...I should add that this arrangement about the survey of Waipoua seems to have given satisfaction to the natives concerned in the matter.

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18th March 1875 - Sir McLean (Native Minister) wrote to Mr Brissenden, - Sir, I have the honour to inform you that the Government have received a letter from Parore, complaining of the survey of the Maunganui block. The Government do not wish the survey of any land to be proceeded with in the face of such opposition as there appears to be in this case. You will, therefore, on receipt of this letter, without delay instruct the surveyors to withdraw from the block, and will, until the dispute is satisfactory settled among the Natives, suspend the negotiations for the purchase of the same. (Note - referring to Ngaitu's repurchase) I have, &c., D. McLean. E.T. Brissenden, Esq, Northern Club, Auckland. (Correspondence Native Land Purchase Agents 1875; Letter 83; Wai Doc Bank: 000378)

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Application for Maunganui made by Tiopira Kinaki - 5th April 1875
(Entry for Maunganui, Kaipara Local Register 1865-75, p100, MLC-A A52, NAA)
Record No 690. When Received April 5 Name of Applicant Tiopira Kinaki.
Fees Charged Hearing £5.00, Memorial 1.00 = £6.0.0 paid Feb 2/76.
Name of Block Maunganui or Omu 38100.0.0. Remarks Receipt acknowledged April 5/75.
Notice issued under Sec 36 Act 73 to District and other Officers April 8/75.
Claim sent to Secretary Kaipara April 12/75.
Notice issued Court to sit at Kaihu Kaipara 19 May 1875.
First Court informed that order has not yet been prepared April 27/75. Court sat - Adjourned.
Wiremu Hohepa - respecting the survey of N.L.C. 15-1133.
Taurau Kukupa asking it may be heard at Kaihu 15 - 1335.
Notice issued Court to sit at Kaihu Kaipara August 18/75. Notice issued sitting of Court postponed to future time.
Notice issued Court to sit at Kaihu 27/1/76.
Map rec'd from I of Surveys & sent Sec't Kaipara Dist 14 Jan'y/76.
Court sat - Memorial Ordered in favour of Parore te Awha & ano'r plan returned & referred to I of Surveys for Custody & c 15/2/76. F.D Fenton Relative to.
Written sideways - Papers at N.L.C 76 - 198. Decision of Court sent to Provincial Gazette & Kahiti for Publication. 27/2/76.
(Note - Kahiti means Gazette in Maori) Apirahana Te Awha & or's applies for rehearing & complains of not receiving share of purchase money. (Note - see letter later on 10th July 1876)
Arama Karaka Haututu & others respecting the presiding in the Court at the hearing of this case vide N.L.C. 76/302 referred to Judge Monro March 13/76.
Wiremu Hohepa applying to have map sent to him & Hohepa was having Mr Dalton's map to next Kaihu sitting. Papers referred to Inspector of Survey.
Papers sent by Inspector of surveys copy of Memorial rec'd from Judge Symonds for transmission to N.M. 12/1/77 forwarded to him 25/1/77 vide 77/41.
Duplicate deed of conveyance received from Mr J.W. Preece for record April 30/77.
Memorial with endorsements of loyality of sale sent to governor by Judge Symonds Nov 19/77 office file sent to Secretary Kaipara April 22/79 Original papers returned May 22/79 attached to copies 28.03.80?

(Note - The application for Maunganui sent in by Tiopira was put in on the same day as the Waoku No.1 case was heard. The Maunganui plan ML 3242 was to follow).

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Ohaeawai April 7, 1875
Gentlemen
I beg to enclose herewith a rough sketch showing the Triangulation extending over the Waimamaku Blocks Waipoua & Maunganui Blocks together with sufficient data upon which to Base your maps of these Blocks. You will observe that the surveys have been connected in several places with the Triangulation quite sufficient for the purpose of an ---------- close. With reference to your Second Plan, (that of the Maunganui Block) mentioned in my last letter to you. I suppose you had better complete it as far as your work goes (Note - being Waikara) and the remainder can be filled in from my sketch of the coast line and from the Old Survey of the Kaihu Block.
The 3 Blocks which you were instructed to survey are to come on for hearing on the 21st May at Hokianga.
If there is time, will you send the plans to the Office first for examination instead of to me, to save time. I have & c SPS
Messrs Wilson
Mangapai
Waitangi Document Bank No 00899
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Record 75/ 1549 Former Papers 75/482 Date of Receipt April 15
Date of letter April 9 No Writer Theo Heale
Residence Auckland
Subject Difficulty in carrying out 72 & 73 clause of Nat land Act and wishes printed forms of agreement in English and Maori.

To whom referred when returned
How disposed of
Filed 28.6.75 75/2235
Maori Affairs Department Register MA 5 13 1875

Record 75/ 2235 Former Papers 75/1549 Date of Receipt May 6
Date of letter May 5 No Writer T Heale
Residence Wellington
Subject In reference to carrying out the 1872 & 73 Section of the Native land Act which requires him to make an agreement for the repayment of survey costs.

To whom referred when returned
How disposed of 3.6.75 75/2886
Maori Affairs Department Register MA 5 13 1875
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Record 75/ 2886 Former Papers 75/2235 Date of Receipt June 10
Date of letter May 26 No Writer W. Webster
Residence Hokianga
Subject Acknowledge & receipt of letter in ref to repayment of costs of surveys from Natives in accordance with Section 72 & 73 NZ Act 73.

To whom referred when returned
How disposed of 28.6.75 75/3172
Maori Affairs Department Register MA 5 13 1875
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Record 75/ 3172 Former Papers 75/2886 Date of Receipt June 24
Date of letter June 14 No Writer Kemp
Residence Auckland
Subject On question on recovering from Natives costs of surveys under Section 72 & 73 of Native land Act.

To whom referred 121 12.7.75 when returned 28.2.76
........1.... J.W. Marchant
How disposed of Filed 13.7.75
Maori Affairs Department Register MA 5 13 1875
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Record 75/ 6141 Former Papers Date of Receipt Dec 3
Date of letter Nov 14 No Writer Te Wharepapa
Residence Kaipara
Subject re land purchases that Natives wish Col. Mc Donnell to carry on same.

To whom referred when returned
How disposed of 75/6142
(Maori Affairs Department Register, MA 2 13 1875)

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Record 75/ 6142 Former Papers 75/6141 Date of Receipt Dec 3
Date of letter Nov 18 No Writer Hari Pati
Residence Mangakahia
Subject asks that Col. McDonnell to be sent there to settle land matters.

To whom referred when returned
How disposed of Filed 20.12.75
(Maori Affairs Department Register, MA 2 13 1875)

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ABOUT TAOHO, CHIEF OF THE ROROA HAPU OF NGATI-WHATUA
Story told by Taoho's son Te Rore Taoho and recorded in 1894?

Te Kaha and Te Kairau lived at Maunganui
1807 After the fall of the battle of Moremo-nui in 1807, Karawai and Te Keha, chiefs of Ngapuhi, (Note - Karawai and Te Keha are in fact the same person and should read as Te Kaha and Te Kairau due to incorrect spelling. Being the same person's as Karawai and Te Keha and were subalterns of Hongi Hika. This has been confirmed by Ngapuhi Leader Graham Rankin a direct descendant of Hone Heke and a Northern Kamatua of Ngapuhi living at Kaikohe in 2000. These two Ngapuhi Chiefs are closely related to the Ngapuhi people) came and dwelt at Maunga-nui Bluff. (about 1806) They dwelt there for a considerable time, (between 1806 to 1824-25) and then they conceived the idea of visiting Taoho (of the Roroa hapu of Ngati-Whatua), who at that time was living at Poutu, on Kaipara North inner head-the present Pilot Station. (Note - this event took place after Hongi Hika returned from England about 1824) They came there to fulfil this desire, but on arrival found that Taoho was not there, but on the other side of the heads, at Okaka, (across the water) which is the south-inner head of Kaipara, where he and his people were digging fern-root. Whilst his men were thus engaged, the old man (Taoho) said, "Let us return home. Some one has arrived at our village." In consequence they returned, for a sign had come to the old man, (Taoho) as was frequently the case. After they were about half way across the Heads and were resting, they saw a woman inland at Poutu waving to them. It was Taoho's own wife who was making the signal, so they hastened onward and soon reached the village. (Note - being by the present day (2000) Poutu Settlement).

Taoho of Roroa arrives back on North Head at Poutu to meet Te Kaha and Te Kairau
On their arrival the usual greetings took place, whilst the fern-root was carried up to the village. The fires were burning, and the fern-root-diggers sat around. As soon as the tangi with the two strangers (Karawai and Te Keha) had ended, the food was cooked and the visitors were fed. They stayed there some days, and on one occasion Karawai (Te Kairau) went forth from the house, but barely had his head got outside when he noticed the sea making a peculiar noise. He stood there listening; then went outside. He then returned inside the house and said, "The sea is making a peculiar noise." Then all went outside, where Te Keha (Te Kaha) went through some performance, (The original merely says "he worked," but evidently something more is meant-probably some form of incantation to enable him to read the omens connected with the queer sounds) and on his return inside the house, said "To-morrow (i.e., shortly) there will be a battle fought; I (my tribe, Ngapuhi) will conquer this sea (or district of Kaipara)-Nga-Puhi will conquer it. (Note - this being just before the predicting of the battle Ikaaranganui to follow in 1825) My ocean is crying to these."

Taoho Begged to Return as he had been in Exile
for nearly 20 Years from 1807

In consequence of this Taoho said to Karawai, (Te Kairau) "Let us go! Take me to my home at Maunga-nui." But Karawai (Te Kairau) replied, "Not so ! Do not you go with me, but follow after me with a party, lest it be said I led you away. Let me go first, you follow after." (Note - This is shortly before the battle of Ika-a-ranganui, 1825).

Short History of Taoho in Exile : 1824
[We must break off this narrative here to explain. In 1807 Toaho of the Roroa hapu of Ngati-Whatua, closely related to Nga-Puhi, and Muru-paenga (the warrior chief of Ngati-Whatua) had fought a pitched battle with Nga-puhi on the long, hard Ripiro beach at a place named Moremo-nui, and there defeated the northern tribe, whose losses were very serious. It is said two of Hongi's brothers were killed there, and ever since that time-indeed, for long before-Nga-Puhi and Ngati-Whatua had constantly been at war.
Hongi went to England in 1820 in order to procure arms to avenge the Nga-Puhi losses at Moremo-nui, and just before he left had arranged with Tareha (Note - a Ngapuhi chief) to lead an expedition against the Kaipara people to commence the campaign that Hongi looked forward to.
Tareha's party created much devastation in the Kaipara district. He would naturally be anxious to kill Taoho, and hence that old man's wish to he taken to Maunga-nui to be under the protection of Karawai (Te Kairau of Ngapuhi). I am so fully persuaded that the Maoris understood telepathy, that Taoho's desire to return across the Heads to Poutu, where, as he said, were visitors, is explainable by this means of communication; as is also, perhaps, though explainable otherwise, the sign that came to Karawai in the peculiar noise the waves made.]

Te Keha and Karawai Return to Maunganui in 1824
After this, Te Keha and Karawai (Te Kaha and Te Kairau) returned home; and not long after Taoho and his people also went north, as far as Te Mamari (which is a rock on the coast shaped like a canoe; it came from across the seas*). *Mamari is on the coast eight miles south of Maunga-nui Bluff, and is said to be where the Hawaikian canoe of that name was wrecked, hence the name O-Mamari, the "place of Mamari in about 1300-40." (Being just north of the Moremo-nui battle site of 1807. Also note Omamari).
Taoho Follows as far North as Mamari
Here the migration turned inland and proceeded to build a pa, but they used only flax-stems. At the same time Taoho dug into a hill there and made a tunnel through it. He thought that if the pa was surprised by a hostile party he would possess a way of escape through that passage. (Note - Taoho frightened of being attacked. Also note Taoho wasn't going to move any further north of this area - re the marking of the sands in 1807).
Now in consequence of the long waiting by Karawai (Te Kairau) at Maunga-nui he sent some men out to look for Taoho and his people (something omitted from the original here).

Kairau sent out Party to Look for Taoho in Order to Arrange a Peace with Hongi
After this event Karawai and Te Keha (Te Kaha and Te Kairau) returned to their old home at Tautoro (five or six miles south of Kai-kohe on the road to Manga-kahia, and on the Punaki-tere branch of the Hokianga River). After settling down there it occurred to them to send for Taoho in order that an interview might be arranged with Hongi* (and peace be made). *This must have been after Hongi Hika returned from England in 1821.

Taoho Taken to Kerikeri
At this time Hongi was living at Te Kerikeri, Bay of Islands. So Taoho went, and on his arrival at Tau-toro went on to Te Waimate, from whence he was escorted by four hundred of Nga-Puhi to Te Kerikeri, where he saw his friend Hongi, and a peace was then made between them. Up to this time Taoho had never returned to his old home at Maunga-nui Bluff even up to the time of his death (but he did return after this), and died there of old age.

The Reason why the Idea of Peace Making with Taoho came about
Formerly, when Karawai and Te Keha (Te Kaha and Te Kairau) lived at Maunga-nui, there once came a chief of Hokianga named Tokowha, (Note - also related to Hongi) an ancestor of Arama Karaka Pi (formerly of Taheke, Hokianga), who wanted Nga-Puhi to have those parts at Maunga-nui as a dwelling place. But Karawai (Te Kairau, Ngapuhi) did not consent to this, and it was an outcome of this that he conceived the idea of the peace making with Hongi as explained above. Hence are the words in Taoho's song, which refer to this event (see the original).

 


 


Introduction

The Allan and Susan Titford story

Timeline of Northland History

Letters and Records of Wi Pou Land Sale

History of Te Roroa

 

 

Letters and Records of Wi Pou Land Sale